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Get ready for the Canadian Federal Elections with our name pronunciation guide

The 2019 Canadian Federal Elections are underway, and things are showing no signs of slowing down as we approach October 21st.

Pronouncing someone’s name correctly shows respect, and indicates you take them seriously. Canadian publication Maclean’s recently ran an article on Jagmeet Singh and the mispronunciation of his name. That’s why we’ve decided to create a quick guide to pronouncing the names of the Canadian leaders.

Of course, as we mentioned previously in our coverage of the US Democratic Primaries Candidates, we are not a news or political publication, so if you want more information on policies, be sure to do your research. And please, remember to vote!

Liberal, NDP and Conservative Leaders

Justin Trudeau

Justin Trudeau is the current Prime Minister of Canada, and head of the Liberal Party. Politics runs in the family: his father, Pierre Eliott Trudeau, was Prime Minister in the 60s and 70s. Trudeau will often answer questions in the language they are asked (English/French), and his name matches that: it can be pronounced in French, or in English.

Jagmeet Singh

Jagmeet Singh leads the NDP in these Canadian Federal Elections. He is a practicing Sikh, and is thus often seen wearing a turban. Singh is a strong advocate for multiculturalism. His first name is pronounced Jug-MEET (like hug, as he mentions in his Twitter bio).

Andrew Scheer

Andrew Scheer is the leader of the Conservative Party. He received an early introduction to politics, and by the age of 25 was elected as an MP. Now he hopes to win a majority in parliament.

Green, Bloc Quebecois, and PPC Leaders

Elizabeth May

Elizabeth May heads the Green Party, who are looking to increase their seats in parliament this election. Because of the increasing pressure on governments and politicians to address climate change, the Green Party is seeing an uptick in support.

Yves-François Blanchet

Yves-François Blanchet represents the Bloc Quebecois. He looks to uphold Quebec’s values and voice in parliament. And of course, since he’s from Quebec, his name is French: the final “t” in his last name is silent, and “Yves” sounds kind of like Eve.

Maxime Bernier

Maxime Bernier of the newly-formed People’s Party of Canada is looking to gain some headway for his party in this election. His controversial (and often questionable) policies have been the talking point of his campaign. Like Blanchet, his last name Bernier reads more like Behr-nyeh

A lot simpler than the US Democrats! There aren’t as many candidates, but their names might still be unfamiliar. Buckle up for the press releases, and remember to get out and vote on October 21st in the Canadian Federal Elections!

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